Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Camp Knitting and Reading

The child's Swirl Yoke Sweater was optional homework for camp. I'm so glad that I started it at home because I really needed help at camp! I would have given up on my own.
I knit up to the armholes at home. The sleeves knit up quickly at camp, but I could not figure out how to get them onto the circular needle without help. The swirl pattern confused me, too, but a camper helped me with that.

Then there is the Pelerine shawl. This is something I would never have appreciated if I had not gone to camp. Pictures simply don't do it justice. Nor can a photo convey the lofty loveliness of unspun Icelandic yarn.
Yes, it is scratchy stuff, but this shawl will be perfect for winter, when it won't touch my skin. I love the history of this yarn: The Vikings brought these sheep to Iceland about 1100 A.D. and the sheep lineage has been kept pure. When you knit with this yarn, you are using the same fiber that the Vikings did! How cool is that?

Unspun Icelandic is carded, but not spun. Instead, it is peeled into strips and wound into "plates." The tables of plates for sale at camp were downright delicious! It is a bit fragile, but you can spit-felt it back together quite easily, which makes colors changes a snap -- and eliminates tails that must be woven in later.

John Green's Paper Towns was my bedtime reading at camp.
I wanted to read it before the movie comes out. You may recognize Green as the author of the best-selling book (and movie), The Fault in Our Stars. Like Stars, Paper Towns is well-written with witty dialogue and a well-planned plot. It mulls over some pretty heavy philosophy, too (in a good way).  It wasn't quite as good as Stars, but if you want more John Green, pick up this one.

I'm joining up with Keep Calm Craft On and Yarn Along. See you there!

11 comments:

  1. LOVE your camp reports! I read everything by John Green over spring break, then I found his blog! My son-in-law watches his YouTube show but I took way to long to connect that they were the same person. ALSO he does some cool things with books online that I used in my high school English class.m he is amazing!!

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  2. The colors you chose for your shawl are gorgeous!

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  3. I agree, those colors for your shawl are beautiful. Now to check out the pattern. Love the baby sweater, too.

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  4. love the colors of your shawl and the yarn choice!! I read fault in our stars but none of his others. Maybe I should!

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  5. Oh my, knitting camp with Meg Swansen! You are so lucky! The Icelandic yarn looks divine - look forward to seeing the shawl in all its glory.

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  6. Your sweater looks lovely and the Icelandic yarn sounds very interesting!! The book is now on my to read list!

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  7. I think of Wallace Stegnar as the dialogue master, so I must John Green
    s dialogue Thanks

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  8. That Viking wool is very cool. Kind of blows your mind, thinking of something from the 12th century related to the fibre in your hands!

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  9. That Viking wool is very cool. Kind of blows your mind, thinking of something from the 12th century related to the fibre in your hands!

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  10. I'm so grateful for people who can help you find your way through a pattern. I'm glad you had success with the other campers on your sweater! I think the colors of your shawl are really lovely. I liked the story of what I am now going to call The viking sheep wool. I am unfamiliar with it. Lastly, I was kind of wondering about that book and that author and now ... I might have to give it a go.

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  11. Oooh, I've never knitted anything in unspun yarn, but it sounds great - in particular the bit about not having any ends to sew in. ;)

    Looking forward to seeing the project grow!

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